DIY | Easy Rope SHelf

I’d been thinking about putting up some shelving in the house for a few weeks so when I came across some hanging shelves I decided to make my own! I’m so delighted with how they turned out, it’s surprisingly easy and not expensive either.. all in all my favourite type of weekend project!

to make your own you’ll need a few basic things, a length of wood (my shelf is a meter width but you can cut the wood to any dimensions) rope, a drill and 2 large hook screws.

I opted for 8mm rope for my shelf so I drilled four 10mm holes in my piece of wood. the holes need to be bigger than the width of the rope or you’ll struggle to feed it through (drill the two holes at each end of the shelf as pictured above)
you can leave the wood bare or paint it, I’ve given mine a few coats of basic white emulsion (you can use wood stain or wood gloss/satin paint depending on what finish you want)
next you’ll need to drill two holes in the wall for the screw hooks (I recommend using wall plugs too) I’ve used the biggest screw hooks I could find as they’ll be taking the weight of the shelf. if you’re not very experience at drilling grab a bf/dad/uncle/friend to help with this!
I cut my rope into 4 x 1m lengths and fed each length through the holes. tie a knot underneath (as above) the rope is very sturdy so this won’t come undone- give it a hard tug to test!
tie the two other ends into a knot and hang them over the two screws to finish! the nice thing about rope shelving is that you can easily adjust the height or level the shelf by adjusting the two top knots.
the materials for this project came in at around £15 and I have enough wood and rope left over to make a smaller shelf for my bathroom!
what do you think.. would you be tempted to try your hand at something similar?

PROJECT APARTMENT: DIY FAUX BAR TABLEpro

Tuesday, March 24, 2015 The Desi Wonder Woman 13 Comments

I’m inventing a term: Faux Bar Table. It’s a term meant to service people like me who don’t drink but love the sex appeal of alcohol bottles and need to have them around to generally be happy individuals. And today I’m going to not only unleash this new term on the world but also generously explain how to realise this fantasy and consequently achieve nirvana.

Boys and girls, let’s start from the beginning.

Who remembers the day when I acquired a ginormous stash of empty alcohol bottles from a friend (one of which ended up like this vase)? I wanted to use them SO bad but inspiration was not hitting me. I didn’t want to paint them; the labels were too bloody pretty for that kind of a massacre and I didn’t want to venture into gimmicky; that would’ve been just cruel to their authenticity. Until one day it hit me. I’ve always loved the mini bar carts/tables that you see on home decor blogs but because I have zero utility for them, it wasn’t something I could possibly do, right? It was then that I thought, WHY NOT. So I brought all of those beauties out (there are still some left over so this is not the last you’re seeing of my stash).

Also, who remembers this guy that I bought about 8 months when I was at my last apartment? I’d picked him up from a closing-out sale and it’s about 30 years old. It had also been sitting around at my current place all this time so I brought him out too because it was time.

Next I picked up this folding table from Dubizzle (the Craigslist of Dubai). It was in great shape and ready for a new life. (Here’s a similar image of what it looks like standing up).

Then I painted it black. The table already had a finished surface so I used a paint + primer so that the paint doesn’t chip off and make me cry. I let it dry overnight. I didn’t use a seal on top because this faux bar table (I feel the term catching on) is in a low traffic zone and only for styling purposes so it’s not going to go through any wear and tear really; I’m only going to inappropriately stare at it for a few mins every day, that’s about it. If you feel the fear, seal it with a water-based polycrylic.
My next goal was to attach the suitcase to the top of the table. Now because I didn’t want to assassinate this beautiful, vintage suitcase, I used double stick tape on all corners of the table to accomplish that. I didn’t place the tape exactly ON the corners because it would show, so move it inwards.You could choose to screw through the suitcase bottom into the table top or some other sophisticated method. But just so you know the double stick tape is holding on like a MOTHER and I honestly couldn’t pull the suitcase back off (I tested).

Before I stuck the suitcase onto the table top, I placed all the bottles inside the suitcase to figure out what arrangement I wanted. Once I knew where I wanted the sizes and colors to go, I removed the bottles (after noting down the order, of course).
I cleaned all dust off the suitcase and then stuck it onto the table top. And at this point, I wanted to just use it as a side-table because it looked so sexy but I told myself that the world needed to know about faux bar tables and that I needed to abandon this side-table idea for the greater good of mankind. (Also, I’ll go back to this in my next apartment).

Then I put all the empty bottles back in.

And just like that the FAUX BAR TABLE was ready, guys. Now while I have my imaginary glass of red wine, let’s check this out from all possible angles because that’s so important.

Until next time.

DIY BEDSIDE BENCH

DIY BEDSIDE BENCH

6U8A92626U8A9283I am still completely obsessed with our home office kilim rugs. They are just so pretty. I really wanted to incorporate a similar pattern into our bedroom. I decided to add a small, foot-of-the-bed bench to our space, and I wanted one that included some kind of kilim rug design (actual or inspired, I’m not that picky). There are a number of different kinds sold online, ranging anywhere from $500-$2000+.

I decided to go ahead and make my own since the project seemed fairly simple. I could then choose my own rug/colors more easily, and the project could be more affordable. I’m so happy I did! I really love this new addition to our bedroom. In case you are curious, here’s how I made my bench:

Supplies for building a benchSupplies:
-3/4″ plywood sheet (mine is 44″ x 18″)
-rug (be sure it is at least 2″-3″ inches wider and longer than the bench top—I bought mine on eBay)
-bench legs (I bought two white combination hairpin legs from here)
-1″ foam batting (sometimes sold by the yard or more; see what’s available at your craft store)
-staples
-eight 1/2″ wood screws

Tools:
-power saw (or you can get the plywood cut at the lumber yard)
-power drill
-staple gun

Cost: $195 (this can vary greatly depending on the type of legs you use or the rug you buy)

Step One: Cut your plywood to the size you need. Again, you can totally have the lumber yard (Home Depot, Lowes, Meek’s, etc.) cut the wood for you if you don’t have a power saw.

How to make a benchStep Two: Cut the foam batting to fit your plywood bench top. I found that it is best if the foam is about 1/4″ smaller on all sides. This helps the rug to fit over the foam and wood a little easier.

Step Three: Begin stapling the rug to the edge of the plywood. It’s best to really take your time and plan out the corners and make sure the rug and top design are going to fit your bench exactly how you like it. I chose to staple down the two longer sides first. Think of this process sort of like wrapping a present. I found it was MUCH easier to hold the rug in place and staple if I had help (thanks, Jacki!).

How to quickly build a benchStep Four: Once you have the first two sides stapled, it’s time to fold the end edges and staple those sides as well. If you have to cut part of the rug to fit your bench size, you can use Fray Check or a little glue to help the ends to keep from fraying.

Step Five: Screw the legs of the bench into place. Be sure to measure to get them centered properly.

6U8A92886U8A9305I love how our new bench added a little more color and pattern into our bedroom. Plus this project turned out to be so simple! Once I had all my supplies, it took less than an hour to complete. I also love that you could easily use a slightly stained or damaged rug for the bench top. Great way to use the part of a rug (or thick blanket) that may have some blemishes. Thanks for letting me share! xo. Emma

P.S. My bench is mostly decorative. If you plan to use your bench for seating, I would recommend bracing the bottom of the bench or possibly using thicker plywood.

Credits // Author: Emma Chapman. Project Assistant: Jacki Moseley. Photography: Sarah Rhodes and Emma Chapman. Photos edited with Petal from the Fresh Collection.

(source: http://www.abeautifulmess.com/)

DIY OCTOPUS ART

I don’t think that I would necessarily choose an Octopus design, but I LOVED this idea !

If you follow me on instgram (@kirstenkrason) you saw that Erin (@erin.m.morgan) and I recently installed a nautical playroom. It looks so cute and I can’t wait to share all the pictures with all of you! Just like any project we had a budget to work with so we wanted to incorporate some DIY ideas.  Today I’m going to share with you how we took a shower curtain and turned it into art!
A few years ago I bought this shower curtain for Jett’s Bathroom.
I’ve always loved it. The graphic is so amazing that it always seemed to me like there must be a way to turn it into art!
When Erin and I started this nautical playroom design we decided to give it a try!
Erin is much handier than me so she figured out how to put the art together once we got out to the install. Here are her instructions!
The shower curtain was 72×72″ so I wanted to leave 2″ on every side
to have room to wrap it over the wood. I went to Home Depot and got 2
2″x1″x70″ for the top and the bottom of the frame then I got 4 2″x1″x68″
for the sides of the frame and the middle supports. Home Depot cut the wood to the desired length for free!
For the frame assembly
I laid all the wood out with the 1″ side facing up, and screwed each
end of the side pieces and the middle pieces  into the top and bottom of
the frame.
I then ironed the shower curtain and laid it over
the top of the frame.
 I nailed in the top first and then stretched it
to where I wanted it on the bottom and nailed in the bottom. Then nailed
in the sides last.
I nailed about every 6-8″. The nailing gave it a
more industrial look instead of a staple gun which could get sloppy. It
was super easy with 2 people, it took us about an hour to make it and
hang it!
Thanks Erin for that easy explanation!After they made the piece Erin and Lindsey just hung it up on the wall with a few nails.

It is seriously such a statement in the room!

Marbling Using Nail Polish

Marbling Using Nail Polish

I have to admit, I’ve been wanting to marble something for a looooooong time! I’ve looked at all the different techniques, but the one that caught my attention was this Marbling Using Nail Polish DIY, which inspired this project So naturally, I gave it a try. Yep, it’s pretty safe to say that I instantly fell in love with how easy it was and how beautiful the results were.

All you will need is a container that’s big enough to submerge your entire object, nail polish and water. Right off the bat I am going to warn you that using old nail polish that you might have kicking around from who knows when will NOT work. I tried it all. It gives you clumpy results, rather than that nice smooth finish you’re looking for.

Marbling Using Nail Polish

Marbling Using Nail Polish

I used nail polish that was fairly new, it doesn’t have to be expensive by any means! Don’t be afraid to practice until you feel comfortable with your technique. I failed the first few times, but finally got it right on my final two projects. For decor, I simply used an As-Is candle holder form IKEA that we got for $2.50 and an old ceramic trophy I found at Target a couple years ago.

Marbling Using Nail Polish

Marbling Using Nail Polish

Fill your container with water and drop your nail polish into the water in whatever pattern you desire. I did little swirls, but you can do anything! You may choose to swirl the polish once it’s in the water with a skewer, but I let the polish take on it’s natural form. Don’t wait too long, within a few seconds you should be dipping your object carefully into your water/polish mixture. I simply pressed one side of my object straight down on one side of the container and turned it on the other side as it was making it’s way out of the water so the entire object was covered. If you just want to dip your object into the mixture, simply submerge it until you have the amount covered, depending on the look you are going for.

Marbling Using Nail Polish

Marbling Using Nail Polish

Carefully place on a dry surface. Do not touch until the object is completely dry! Once dry, display your piece and enjoy!  I’ve tried all kinds of colors, there are so many beautiful outcomes! It’s impossible to not have fun with this.

Marbling Using Nail Polish

IMarbling Using Nail Polish

(source: http://www.hellolidy.com/)

DIY Painted Rug Inspired by West Elm

I don’t know about you, but I LOVE area rugs! They instantly change the way a space looks, and are an easy {and temporary} way to add color or pattern to a room.

However, if you are on a tight budget {like us} then you may quickly realize that the area rug you want is out of your price range, boooooo.  But then that’s the beauty of DIY, am I right? You can find a style you like and then re-create it in a way that reflects your personality, without spending a ton of money. All it takes is a little bit of time and patience. Trust me, if I can do it, so can you!

DIY Painted Rug upcycledtreasures.com

Today I am sharing how I created a DIY painted Rug inspired by West Elm, for just $20!

I had originally planned to paint the rug I currently have in my office/studio but after coming across a pattern I loved,  I realized I could get the same look with just a sharpie. In case you missed that post or want a refresh you can see my West Elm Inspired Rug here {pictured below}. If you plan to use a design with more lines and less filled in shapes I would definitely recommend the sharpie route. It’s easy, looks great and the rug still feels super soft!

DIY Painted Rug upcycledtreasures.com

However, if you are looking to fill in patterns and shapes with more color then you may want to try out the painted rug route.

West Elm Inspired DIY Painted Rug:

One day while browsing the West Elm website I came across the  Phoenix Wool Dhurrie rug and instantly fell in love. The geometric/kilim pattern was fun, simple, classic and modern all rolled into one. It seemed perfect for our dining room!

Of course the price tag of $350 for a 5×8 was a bit steep for us so I decided to create my own version using this design as my inspiration.

I know that one of the reasons area rugs can be expensive is because of the materials and craftsmanship involved. My rug wouldn’t be nearly as perfect or soft, but I was okay with that. When you have $20 you can spend on a rug, you have to make do with what you have. Besides, I really enjoy all of the stories behind the DIY projects in our home, and no one has anything exactly like it 🙂

The inspiration:

West-Elm-Phoenix Wool Dhurrie Rug

Here is the before photo of my 5×7 Remnant Rug:

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Materials Needed:

Paper/Printer

Rug

Measuring Tape

Paint

Fabric Medium

Chalk

Sharpie

foam brushes

Painter’s Tape

Cardboard Template of shapes to use {optional}

Scissors

drop cloth/newspapers

Fabric Protector

Patience

90’s Music {optional}

By the way, one of my favorite ways to save money on rugs is to purchase remnant rugs from Home Depot or Lowes.  The rug I used in my office cost less than $30 and the one I’m sharing today was only $20! I always like to check to see what remnant rugs are in stock when I’m in there because it can be somewhat random, and you never know what you will find. I’m all about the treasure hunt so I’m okay with that 🙂 It would have been nice to get one a bit larger but I figured 5×7 would do, especially for the price!

DIY Painted Rug upcycledtreasures.com

I already had the fabric medium on hand that you use to mix with your paint color since I had purchased it back when I bought the rug above, thinking I’d use it, but didn’t. I did actually use some of it on the DIY lace curtains I shared. I purchased the $20 remnant rug soon after we finished building our West Elm Inspired dining table, so I actually had everything on hand that I needed, woo-hoo! You can use acrylic or latex paint, and I just used some custom mixed navy and turquoise paint.  Just make sure that if you custom mix a paint color, that you make more than enough. The last thing you want is to run out of paint before your rug is finished.

The first thing I did was create the shape templates in illustrator. I’m not gonna lie, I suck at math and am a more visual person so I thought planning it out on the computer would be easier. Plus this way I could play around with where I wanted the shapes and what color to make them too. I actually still screwed it up, but I’ll get to that a little later…

DIY Painted Rug upcycledtreasures.com

I decided to create 3 separate shapes, enlarge them, and then printed each individual shape out from my home printer. Each shape took up a few pieces of paper so I used some of the Delicate Frog Tape to tape the pieces of paper together. I actually won a bunch of Frog Tape {YAY!} when I attended Haven, and I had never used the delicate kind before. It was perfect because it didn’t tear the paper and I even had to move it around a couple times.

After each shape was taped together I cut the shape out, then placed it on a piece of cardboard, traced it with a sharpie, and then cut out the new cardboard template. The cardboard template is what I used to “stencil” onto the rug. The photos below probably explain this better than I can.

DIY Painted Rug upcycledtreasures.com

I did this for all 3 shapes until I had 3 separate templates cut out of cardboard.

DIY Painted Rug upcycledtreasures.com

After I had all of my cardboard templates printed out I started marking out my measurements onto the rug using chalk as a guide for where my templates would start. This is when I realized I totally screwed up my plan.

When I enlarged the shapes on my computer I apparently made them too large, which threw off my original design plan. Oops. I had even tested out the first template to see how it would fit along the rug, but had only gone along the height of the rug, and not the width. This meant that I had to alter my design a bit and went with just 3 columns of vertical shapes. I considered re-printing and cutting the templates but decided just to roll with the punches instead.

It didn’t take long to line up where the shapes would go since I lined the first column against the edge and 3.5 inches apart, and then started the middle column smack dab in the center. I also used my original printed out shapes as a guide in addition to my cardboard templates {as seen in the photo below}. Once I had my template lined up I simply traced around it using a sharpie marker. I alternated between 2 different sharpies to make it easier when one was running low on ink.

DIY Painted Rug upcycledtreasures.com

DIY Painted Rug upcycledtreasures.com

This took a bit longer than expected and it was pretty late, so after I had traced all of the shapes I decided I would do the painting part the next day.

DIY Painted Rug upcycledtreasures.com

DIY Painted Rug upcycledtreasures.com

By the way, the paint dried slightly darker than it originally looked when I painted it on. Just FYI so you don’t end up with a color darker than you wanted. It’s probably best to test an area first to see if the color looks the way you want it to. I had started painting one of the patterns on my rug and then decided I wanted the color a bit lighter, so I just painted over the part I originally painted.

DIY Painted Rug upcycledtreasures.com

Before I started painting I put a couple of old tablecloths underneath the rug just to make sure no paint went through. You could use a dropcloth, newspapers, an old sheet, etc. The paint didn’t go through the rug at all actually, but better safe than sorry, right? I worked on the rug in our bedroom with the door shut so our pets wouldn’t run all over it or have their fur fly in the paint. Funny how as soon as a door shuts they freak out and wanna come in. If you have pets are yours the same way?

After I had my navy paint color mixed I used a foam brush {several actually} to apply the paint to the shapes on the rug. I originally tried a regular paint brush but found that the foam brushes worked much better. If you have really large shapes or stripes you could also use a foam roller.

DIY Painted Rug upcycledtreasures.com

After the paint had dried I actually went around and painted over the shapes one more time. A couple hours and many foam brushes later, my rug looked like this:

DIY Painted Rug upcycledtreasures.com

and my brushes looked like this:

DIY Painted Rug upcycledtreasures.com

Lol. Well, even when the foam part broke off I still used it to sorta squeegee the paint onto the rug. It worked surprisingly well and I wasn’t afraid to get a little messy.

I actually really liked how the rug looked with just the dark navy {it looks a bit darker in the photos then it does in person}. Our dining room doesn’t get too much light though and is super beige so I wanted to add a pop of turquoise to brighten it up a bit.

I was impatient so after a few hours it seemed dry enough so I went ahead and started painting around the edges of the pattern using a smaller paintbrush and some custom mixed turquoise paint. Don’t you just love how the paint is in an old tostitos jar? haha.

DIY Painted Rug upcycledtreasures.com

DIY Painted Rug upcycledtreasures.com

It was so much fun watching the rug transform before my eyes, talk about instant gratification! At first I was bummed that I screwed up my original design plan, because I really wanted to have more than 3 columns, but I still think it turned out pretty awesome. In fact, I think it worked out pretty good because now there is more contrast in the dining room with the additional white showing on the carpet.

Here is the rug all finished:

DIY Painted Rug upcycledtreasures.com

DIY Painted Rug upcycledtreasures.com

I actually want to pick up some fabric protector to spray over it just to make sure all that hard work lasts. I will probably do that next weekend.

So what do you think? Have you painted a rug before or are you considering making one? I LOVE our new dining room rug and I will admit that the painted areas are a bit stiff but not too terrible and since it’s in the dining room and not the bedroom I’m totally cool with that.

DIY Painted Rug upcycledtreasures.com

I am including the templates I created in case you want to use them for your own home project – be that a rug, wall, furniture, art, etc. Just remember these are for personal use only 🙂 If you do use them on a project I’d love to see it afterwards! The sizes of the templates are rather large and arenot perfect, but hopefully you can get some use out of them. I am including each individual shape I used, and then all 3 scaled down as well. You don’t have to use the same pattern either, but can play around with the shapes to create a new one too!

Download FREE Printable Templates

Click on the download button below the images below to download the kilim Pattern Stencil Templates that you can use on a rug or any other design project.

DIY Painted Rug upcycledtreasures.com

download-button-upcycledtreasures-01

DIY Painted Rug upcycledtreasures.com

download-button-upcycledtreasures-01

DIY Painted Rug upcycledtreasures.com

download-button-upcycledtreasures-01

DIY Painted Rug upcycledtreasures.com

download-button-upcycledtreasures-01

These templates are for personal use only, and cannot be resold or redistributed.

 UPDATE: I’ve had this rug for about a year now and still LOVE it! It seems to have gotten softer over time – although the painted areas are still crunchy} and is holding up really well. I have no problems vacuuming it or doing spot cleaning. The best advice I could give is that if you create a custom color be sure to have extra set aside, or know exactly how you made it. There are a few spots where my cats have scratched the rug and it could use a couple touchups, but I don’t have the same paint so I’ll have to try to color match it.

Here are some photos of it in our dining room:

DIY Painted Rug upcycledtreasures.com

DIY Painted Rug upcycledtreasures.com

DIY Painted Rug upcycledtreasures.com

(source: http://upcycledtreasures.com/)

Log Slice Table

Log table

Note: Greg’s back!

There’s nothing unusual about an end table that’s made from a chunk of tree; in fact, you probably own a few yourself. Things start to get exciting, however, when you can still see the bark and count the rings to find its age! Tree decor is everywhere these days — from branch chandeliers and coat hooks to log pedestals and candle holders. When Jennifer and I saw these log side tables in Domino magazine (Ippolita’s Cigarette), we had to have one (or two or three).

The only trouble was the exorbitant $1,100 starting price. Each. (In comparison, the most expensive piece of furniture we own is the IKEA Malm bed we bought secondhand via Craigslist in Atlanta.) So we decided to do things the old-fashioned way and turn a little elbow grease and a cannibalized IKEA stool into our own log table.

Table top

The first order of business was acquiring the log. My parents burn a fair amount of wood both for grilling humongous burgers and to ward off those frigid Southern California winters. Consequently, my dad is always willing to stop for free firewood someone has put out by the curb, including this large section of downed pine they let us scavenge from their wood pile.

The next step was to cut a five inch slice of the wood for the table top. This is best accomplished with a chain saw, which is great for cutting logs but leaves the wood rough and uneven. To level out the surface, I broke out the belt sander. Belt sanders wear down wood very quickly, which makes them great for leveling uneven spots but (at least in my hands) leaves behind imperfections of their own. So after approximately leveling the surface with the belt sander, I took an orbital sander to it, beginning with 80 grit to remove the belt sander marks. I gradually increased the grit, ending with 200 to give it a nice, smooth finish.

Sanding

Finally, after disposing of the resulting dust (with a rag and air compressor), I applied three coats of polyacrylic to the top for protection from nicks and liquids. I also applied clear lacquer spray to the bark on the sides for protection.

Tree rings

We then attached the log to the legs of an IKEA Marius stool ($5.99). For a more rustic look, we spray painted the glossy legs with flat black paint.

Log table

Photo of Ippolito Cigarette from Domino Magazine (RIP!)

(source: http://seakettle.com/)